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A Review of Current Technology-Based Intervention for School Aged Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Part of the Lecture Notes in Networks and Systems book series (LNNS,volume 16)

Abstract

For individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), the use of Computer technology to provide intervention in learning is promising. This review focuses on research that has used technology to improve the performance for school aged (10–16) children with ASD. This paper reviews technologies that enhanced intervention, which target three cognitive domains: (1) languages and literacy, (2) social skills, and (3) emotion recognition. A review of the literature from 2005 to the end of 2015 identified 19 studies that documented efficacy in order to determine whether empirical findings support technology as an evidence-based practice. The conclusion reports that it is important to support development, evaluation, and clinical usage of technology-based intervention for individuals with autism spectrum disorders. Future directions for research and practice with each technology are discussed.

Keywords

  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Computer
  • Technologies
  • Intervention

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Fig. 1.
Fig. 2.

taken from Bernardini et al. [27]

Fig. 3.

from Alves et al. [36]

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Correspondence to Sumayh S. Aljameel .

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Aljameel, S.S., O’Shea, J.D., Crockett, K.A., Latham, A. (2018). A Review of Current Technology-Based Intervention for School Aged Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. In: Bi, Y., Kapoor, S., Bhatia, R. (eds) Proceedings of SAI Intelligent Systems Conference (IntelliSys) 2016. IntelliSys 2016. Lecture Notes in Networks and Systems, vol 16. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-56991-8_63

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