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Dying Autonomously

  • Michael Quante
Chapter
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Part of the Philosophy and Medicine book series (PHME, volume 126)

Abstract

There is, as Tom L. Beauchamp (1996, p. 1) observes, no longer-lasting or stronger proscription in medicine than that which says that one must not kill patients. The trend towards the principle of respect for autonomy and medical-technological developments have, however, led increasingly to this ban coming under fire in recent decades, whereby these two tendencies go hand in hand: where medical possibilities, if anything, promote the quantity rather than quality of life, and patients can (and must) be kept alive under conditions which are not considered worth living, the question arises as to why a human should not be allowed to end these phases in his life (or have them ended). The more dominant the notion of an autonomous life style and the basic attitude that ultimately everyone is solely responsible for his valuations becomes, the more the claim suggests itself that doctors should, with their knowledge and skill, provide relief for the suffering of patients who are merely surviving.

Keywords

Narrow Sense Personal Autonomy Autonomous Decision Ethical Evaluation Assisted Suicide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Quante
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MünsterMünsterGermany

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