Towards a Total Workplace Innovation Concept Based on Sociotechnical Systems Design

Chapter
Part of the Aligning Perspectives on Health, Safety and Well-Being book series (AHSW)

Abstract

This chapter aims at developing a more comprehensive design theory for stakeholders who are involved in design processes aimed at workplace innovation, by starting from sociotechnical design and by exploring how we can broaden that perspective with other approaches, to also cover issues such as IT-design and HR-design. This chapter will focus on STS-D theory for the design of the division of labour as developed in the Lowlands (Netherlands and Belgium). In addition to STS-D theory, other theories and practices for designing control, coordination and support systems have been developed, such as Lean Thinking, Total Productive Maintenance, HRM theories, Relation Coordination theory, ICT theories, the practice of the New World of Work (time and place independent work) and Sociocracy for participative strategic decision making. In this chapter we will outline a start for combining these approaches with STS-D theory to develop a systemic concept of Total Workplace Innovation (TWIN). As such, this chapter is an essayist and conceptualising approach to organisational design theory.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors and publisher gratefully acknowledge the following permission to use the material in this book: Pierre van Amelsvoort & Geert van Hootegem, Towards a total workplace innovation concept based on sociotechnical systems design. In: European Work and Organizational Psychology in Practice. Special issue on Workplace Innovation, 2017, Volume 1, 31–45.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Catholic University Leuven, KU LeuvenLeuvenBelgium

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