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Fatigue Crack Propagation

  • René Alderliesten
Chapter
Part of the Solid Mechanics and Its Applications book series (SMIA, volume 236)

Abstract

This chapter explains the fatigue damage growth phenomena in FMLs, and provides theories to describe the growth of damage based on the individual fracture phenomena. The validity of various geometrical correction factors is discussed. The different crack geometries through-thickness and the crack paths, observed in FMLs, are explained for both in-axis and off-axis loading. Finally, the relation between variable amplitude and constant amplitude loading is covered.

Keywords

Fatigue Crack Stress Intensity Factor Crack Growth Rate Fatigue Crack Growth Metal Layer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • René Alderliesten
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Aerospace EngineeringDelft University of TechnologyDelftThe Netherlands

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