Stress and Strain

Chapter
Part of the Solid Mechanics and Its Applications book series (SMIA, volume 236)

Abstract

The in-plane mechanical properties of FMLs have been described with methods ranging from simple engineering methods to scientific laminated plate theories. This chapter describes the current understanding of stress and strain in FMLs, explaining the laminated plate theories adapted for the different thermal expansion properties of both metal and composites, and the plasticity induced by the metallic constituent. The application and limitations of the various methods are addressed.

Keywords

Residual Stress Metallic Layer Shear Property Compliance Matrix Principal Material 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Aerospace EngineeringDelft University of TechnologyDelftThe Netherlands

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