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Laminate Concepts & Mechanical Properties

  • René Alderliesten
Chapter
Part of the Solid Mechanics and Its Applications book series (SMIA, volume 236)

Abstract

Inspired by the successful application of ARALL and GLARE on aeronautical structures, many researchers and scientists have pursued the development of FML concepts. The fact that the majority of these studies never reached maturity on structural applications may be explained by the observation that FML was mostly treated as a material concept. As a result, not enough consideration was given to the final structural applications. Nonetheless, many FML variants with their properties presented in the literature constitute valuable information for future developments. Therefore, an overview of all the FMLs and the most characteristic properties are given in this chapter.

Keywords

Carbon Fibre Fatigue Crack Growth Residual Strength Aluminium Layer Adhesive System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • René Alderliesten
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Aerospace EngineeringDelft University of TechnologyDelftThe Netherlands

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