Residual Strength

Chapter
Part of the Solid Mechanics and Its Applications book series (SMIA, volume 236)

Abstract

The residual strength in FMLs can be described differently depending on the geometry of the initial damage. Theories and prediction models are presented for through-cut cracks and fatigue through cracks, based on R-curve and critical crack tip opening angle concepts. For part-through cracks, linear relations based on a damage ratio are presented, while for surface cracks a method is presented based on the through-thickness strain distribution, in combination with the corresponding stress concentration factor. In the end the damage tolerance after impact is discussed, explaining how the residual stress state in the plastically deformed dent improves the residual strength.

Keywords

Fatigue Crack Crack Length Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanic Residual Strength Crack Configuration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Aerospace EngineeringDelft University of TechnologyDelftThe Netherlands

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