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Introduction: Integration as a Three-Way Process

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Migrant Integration Between Homeland and Host Society Volume 1

Part of the book series: Global Migration Issues ((IOMS,volume 7))

Abstract

Around 25 million persons born in a third country are currently living in the European Union (EU), representing 5% of its total population. Integrating migrants, i.e. allowing them to participate in the country of destination’s society at the same level as natives, is an active rather than passive process that involves two parties, the country of destination and the migrants, working together to build a cohesive society.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    “Integration as a three-way process: the role of countries of origin in migrant integration” was a 2-year research project co-funded by the European Integration Fund 2011.

  2. 2.

    Gordon is here referring to Fishman’s definition of “core society” and “core culture” (Fishman 1961).

  3. 3.

    See for example (Glazer and Moynihan 1970).

  4. 4.

    See for example Van Tubergen 2004; Levels et al. 2008; Tribalat 1996; Alba et al. 2003; Cheung and Heath 2007.

  5. 5.

    Glick Schiller and Levitt’s answer (2006) to Waldinger and Fitzgerald’s (2004) criticisms of transnationalism still focuses on the migrants, and not on States and civil society organisations.

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Correspondence to Agnieszka Weinar .

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Unterreiner, A., Weinar, A. (2017). Introduction: Integration as a Three-Way Process. In: Weinar, A., Unterreiner, A., Fargues, P. (eds) Migrant Integration Between Homeland and Host Society Volume 1. Global Migration Issues, vol 7. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-56176-9_1

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