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Drusenoid Retinal Pigment Epithelial Detachment

  • Monika FleckensteinEmail author
  • Arno Philipp Göbel
  • Steffen Schmitz-Valckenberg
  • Frank Gerhard Holz
Chapter

Abstract

Drusenoid pigment epithelial detachments (PED) are most commonly associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and primarily represent a feature of the non-neovascular stage. However, discrimination between drusenoid, serous, or vascularized PED is challenging albeit of high relevance since the clinical management and the course of disease differs.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Monika Fleckenstein
    • 1
    Email author
  • Arno Philipp Göbel
    • 1
  • Steffen Schmitz-Valckenberg
    • 1
  • Frank Gerhard Holz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of OphthalmologyUniversity of BonnBonnGermany

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