Conclusion: Reimagining Class

Chapter

Abstract

A critical reimagining of class discourse offers the best prospect for deepening understandings about their meaning. This has not yet occurred, because class analysis still relies on singular theories to explain class phenomenon. These fail, because class has multiple meanings, all of which need to be understood. Narrating their conceptual histories would lead to radical changes in the way that ‘class’ is taught and studied.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.La Trobe UniversityMelbourneAustralia

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