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On Bad Sex and Bad Seed: Doubting Deuteronomy

  • Bernon Lee
Chapter
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Part of the Postcolonialism and Religions book series (PCR)

Abstract

Lee, in this chapter, takes a deconstructive agenda to Deuteronomy 22–24 from a Third World feminist perspective. While the literary topoi remain the same from previous chapters—sexual impropriety, Israel and its ‘others,’ the purity of the camp, and sacred offerings—emancipative interests probe inconsistencies in Israel’s characterization of parties excluded from its assembly on the grounds of moral and genetic defect. The reader’s suspicion, then, carries over into a negative evaluation of Israel’s construct of gender in marriage in adjacent laws. Lee’s reading unravels the variedly (intersectional) discriminatory identity building project of Deuteronomy 22–24 against a backdrop of currents in decolonizing discourse that blend inequities of gender and race. Israel’s views of the ‘other’ and its correlation of valued values come apart.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bernon Lee
    • 1
  1. 1.Bethel UniversitySt. PaulUSA

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