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Design Thinking: Problem Solving in the Diverse Workplace

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Abstract

Numerous studies have been conducted on changing corporate, nonprofit, educational, and other workplace cultures over the last two decades. However, even as the need for change is recognized, the question arises how are strategic decisions made in order to have transformative alterations in management decisions to promote new innovative products, solutions, and resources? This chapter will define, highlight, and discuss through interactive case studies and exercises, Design Thinking implementation in the corporate, educational, governmental, and nonprofit workplaces. Through practical scenarios, readers will be guided through the wonderful, human-centered ventures of Design Thinking principles for problem-solving, the implementation and planning of transforming recommendations revealed through the process.

Keywords

  • Design thinkingDesign Thinking (DT)
  • Problem solvingProblem Solving
  • innovationInnovation
  • Product developmentProduct Development
  • empathyEmpathy

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Mickahail, B.K. (2018). Design Thinking: Problem Solving in the Diverse Workplace. In: Aquino, C., Robertson, R. (eds) Diversity and Inclusion in the Global Workplace. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-54993-4_6

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