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The Man and His Legacy

  • Joe S. Jeffers
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Molecular Science book series (BRIEFSMOLECULAR)

Abstract

How does one paint a picture of Fred Sanger (Fig. 8.1)? After all, his life of techniques was devoted to the visual. He loved painting as a child and maintained that hobby until his twilight years. He shunned column chromatography, when possible, for paper and thin-layer techniques. Fred wanted to see the results. His polyacrylamide sequencing gels were visual masterpieces.

Keywords

Nobel Prize Postdoctoral Fellow Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Exact Amino Acid Research Development Corporation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of ChemistryOuachita Baptist UniversityArkadelphiaUSA

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