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Nudging Toward Neuroethics: Prehistory and Foundations

  • Albert R. JonsenEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Neuroethics book series (AIN)

Abstract

As neurological science and its medical application in neurology and neurosurgery evolved during the twentieth century, ethical questions began to emerge about the relationship between mind and body. This chapter outlines how some of the earliest questions, although only slightly noted at the time, anticipated the appearance of a new discipline called neuroethics.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.California Pacific Medical CenterSan FranciscoUSA

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