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Screening and Assessment of Trauma in Clinical Populations

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Abstract

Clinicians should be prepared to screen for and assess trauma in LGBT populations given the prevalence of trauma among these patients. A trauma-informed context (awareness, safety, and autonomy) optimizes these efforts. Specialized screening and assessment considerations are relevant given the unique cultural context experienced by LGBT people, and clinicians can play a crucial role in facilitating resilience in those who have experienced trauma. Clinicians should tailor assessment instruments to evaluate LGBT-specific traumatic and stressful experiences. Healthcare providers should approach LGBT individuals with openness, humility, and a genuine curiosity to understand.

Keywords

  • Screening
  • Assessment
  • Standardized instruments
  • Growth
  • Resilience
  • Trauma-informed care
  • Coming out
  • People of color
  • Youth
  • Development

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Correspondence to Brian Hurley MD, MBA, DFASAM .

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Hurley, B., Lin, K., Jani, S.N., Kapila, K. (2017). Screening and Assessment of Trauma in Clinical Populations. In: Eckstrand, K., Potter, J. (eds) Trauma, Resilience, and Health Promotion in LGBT Patients. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-54509-7_15

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-54509-7_15

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