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Answering for Someone Else: Proxy Reports in Survey Research

Abstract

When a respondent is randomly selected from a household they may not be available to respond to the survey personally. In some cases, survey procedures allow for another member of the household to respond on behalf of the sampled respondent. When this happens the survey data are said to have been collected from a proxy for the respondent. Some of the largest and most important surveys in the USA regularly collect data from proxies, including the Census, the Current Population Survey, General Social Survey, and the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health). The use of proxies allows for faster data collection at substantially lower cost. This chapter outlines the practice of using proxy reports in survey data collection and highlights the cost/benefit tradeoffs that come when these reports are used.

Keywords

  • Proxy Reports
  • General Social Survey (GSS)
  • Current Population Survey (CPS)
  • National Longitudinal Study
  • Fast Data Collection

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to Curtiss Cobb .

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Cobb, C. (2018). Answering for Someone Else: Proxy Reports in Survey Research. In: Vannette, D., Krosnick, J. (eds) The Palgrave Handbook of Survey Research . Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-54395-6_12

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