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Foreign Capital Flows and Output Growth Volatility in Selected Sub-Saharan African Countries

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Development Finance

Abstract

: This study tests the hypothesis that increased international financial integration helps emerging and developing economies to better manage output growth volatility. It uses the system dynamic panel model to analyse secondary data covering forty-two (42) sub-Saharan African countries. The study confirms the hypothesis that a higher level of international financial integration reduces instability in growth of output.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    The list of countries selected for the study are as follows. Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Congo Brazzaville, Cote d’Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, The Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

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Correspondence to Nicholas Biekpe .

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Appendix

Appendix

The list of countries selected for the study are as follows. Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Congo Brazzaville, Cote d’Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, The Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

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Brafu-Insaidoo, W.G., Biekpe, N. (2017). Foreign Capital Flows and Output Growth Volatility in Selected Sub-Saharan African Countries. In: Biekpe, N., Cassimon, D., Mullineux, A. (eds) Development Finance. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-54166-2_8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-54166-2_8

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