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Mafia and Organised Crime: The Spectrum and the Models

Part of the Critical Criminological Perspectives book series (CCRP)

Abstract

The second chapter presents the theoretical boundaries of the book, by looking at the intersections between criminology and criminal law theories and by introducing a first analysis of the conceptualisations of both mafia and organised crime. This chapter explains how manifestations of organised crime and mafia can be placed on a spectrum, on a continuum, depending on their characteristics. It also presents the methodology to build the national case studies and policing models in Italy, US, Australia and UK that will follow around the general dichotomy of structures vs. activities.

Keywords

  • Criminal law
  • Membership offence
  • Conspiracy
  • Harm principle
  • Organised crime-mafia spectrum
  • Policing

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Fig. 2.1
Fig. 2.2

Notes

  1. 1.

    Intended as attitude to mind one’s own business as a sign of respect or out of fear of consequences. See Omertà in the Global Informality Encyclopedia, at: http://in-formality.com/wiki/index.php?title=Omertà for more details.

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Sergi, A. (2017). Mafia and Organised Crime: The Spectrum and the Models. In: From Mafia to Organised Crime. Critical Criminological Perspectives. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-53568-5_2

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