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Introduction: The aims of this comparative research

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Part of the Critical Criminological Perspectives book series (CCRP)

Abstract

The introduction sets the aims of the book. It described the different stages and places of the data collection and the theoretical frameworks of comparative studies in criminal justice within which the data has been analysed. It sets the expectations on methodology and theoretical underpinnings on mafia and organised crime guiding the following chapters.

Keywords

  • Comparative criminal justice
  • Qualitative research
  • Experts research
  • Policing

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Notes

  1. 1.

    The semiotic square was introduced by Algirdas Greimas to better analyse paired concepts. At the basis of the semiotic square is a visualisation of characteristics of a text, in terms of semantic convergences and divergences. See Greimas A. (1987) On Meaning: Selected Writings in Semiotic Theory (trans. Perron PJ and Collins FH). London: Frances Pinter.

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Sergi, A. (2017). Introduction: The aims of this comparative research. In: From Mafia to Organised Crime. Critical Criminological Perspectives. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-53568-5_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-53568-5_1

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  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Macmillan, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-319-53567-8

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-319-53568-5

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