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Designing a Process of Change

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Part of the Advanced Sciences and Technologies for Security Applications book series (ASTSA)

Abstract

Police reforms have typically focused on the similarities between police officers rather than their differences, and top-down management control rather than rank and file participation. By approaching change in such a fashion opportunities have been lost to pursue different ways of managing—not all officers require the same amount of supervision, to engage police personnel in reform efforts, and to identify outstanding officers and learn from them [70]. Instead, reform efforts have generally assumed that all police personnel are the same, thereby promoting a one-size fits all model.

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Fig. 8.1
Fig. 8.2

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Workman-Stark, A.L. (2017). Designing a Process of Change. In: Inclusive Policing from the Inside Out. Advanced Sciences and Technologies for Security Applications. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-53309-4_8

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