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Barriers to Inclusion

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Abstract

There are all kinds of examples of men and women who have rewarding and positive careers in policing. They have a sense of belonging. They have opportunities for advancement and they are supported in their development. However, for a number of women, minority group members and even some white heterosexual men, there are numerous barriers that continue to prevent them from being fully included in the workplace. By understanding these barriers police leaders are in a much better position to make the necessary changes and improve the workplace experience.

Keywords

  • Police Officer
  • Sexual Harassment
  • Sexual Minority
  • Gender Stereotype
  • Maternity Leave

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Workman-Stark, A.L. (2017). Barriers to Inclusion. In: Inclusive Policing from the Inside Out. Advanced Sciences and Technologies for Security Applications. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-53309-4_4

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