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Home, Identity and Belonging

  • Zosa De Sas Kropiwnicki
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies on Children and Development book series (PSCD)

Abstract

This chapter discusses home-making in exile, a contested domain in which children and adults tried to inscribe their own sense of belonging based on imagined and real, remembered and invented notions or myths of home and the homeland. These notions often centred on reified cultural or nationalist practices and performances. Others grounded their sense of identity and belonging in the exile community and an overarching identification with the liberation struggle, the project of return to South Africa and the moral discourse of non-discrimination and cosmopolitanism. As multi-positioned agents, second-generation exiles reinterpreted dominant discourses and drew selectively on notions of home, identity and belonging in their attempts to create spaces of inclusion in response to racism and xenophobia.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zosa De Sas Kropiwnicki
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anthropology and Development StudiesUniversity of JohannesburgJohannesburgSouth Africa

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