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Doggerland and the Lost Frontiers Project (2015–2020)

  • Vince GaffneyEmail author
  • Robin Allaby
  • Richard Bates
  • Martin Bates
  • Eugene Ch’ng
  • Simon Fitch
  • Paul Garwood
  • Garry Momber
  • Philip Murgatroyd
  • Mark Pallen
  • Eleanor Ramsey
  • David Smith
  • Oliver Smith
Chapter
Part of the Coastal Research Library book series (COASTALRL, volume 20)

Abstract

As this volume, the final monograph of the SPLASHCOS network, was being finalised, the European Research Council agreed to fund a major new project relating to the marine palaeolandscapes of the southern North Sea. Emerging from the earlier work of the North Sea Palaeolandscapes Project (NSPP), the Lost Frontiers project seeks to go beyond the maps generated by that ground-breaking research. Led by researchers in the fields of archaeogeophysics, molecular biology and computer simulation, the project seeks to develop a new paradigm for the study of past environments, ecological change and the transition between hunter gathering societies and farming in North West Europe. Following from earlier work, the project will seek to release the full potential of the available seismic reflectance data sets to generate topographical maps of the whole of early Holocene Doggerland that are as accurate and complete as possible. Using these data, the study will then reconstruct and simulate the emerging palaeoenvironments of Doggerland using conventional palaeoenvironmental data, as well as ancient DNA extracted directly from sediment cores along the routes of two submerged river valleys. Using this base data, the project aims to transform our understanding of the colonisation and development of floral, faunal and human life, to explore the Mesolithic landscapes and to identify incipient Neolithic signals indicating early contact and development within the region of Doggerland.

Keywords

Lost Frontiers Doggerland Remote sensing sedaDNA Modelling 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank Lawrence Heyworth, Managing Director of Look and Learn Ltd., for his assistance in tracing Arthur Mee’s work on the Dogger Banks in the extensive Look and Learn archives, and Dr. T.D. Holt-Wilson for drawing our attention to Beirne’s interesting volume in a mail dated 15/04/2015. Nick Wilkinson and Susan Liberator at the Ohio State University library service kindly sought out the reference to the digital copies of Mee’s compendium works held in Ohio, and Marion Watson excavated references to Ernest A. Bryant from the copy of Arthur Mee’s ‘The Children’s Encyclopedia’ given to her as a child. We also gratefully acknowledge the European Research Council’s support for the Lost Frontiers Project through the provision of an Advanced Grant (Grant Agreement 670518 ERC-2014-ADG/ERC-2014-ADG).

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vince Gaffney
    • 1
    Email author
  • Robin Allaby
    • 2
  • Richard Bates
    • 3
  • Martin Bates
    • 4
  • Eugene Ch’ng
    • 5
  • Simon Fitch
    • 1
  • Paul Garwood
    • 6
  • Garry Momber
    • 7
  • Philip Murgatroyd
    • 1
  • Mark Pallen
    • 2
  • Eleanor Ramsey
    • 1
  • David Smith
    • 6
  • Oliver Smith
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Archaeological SciencesUniversity of BradfordBradfordUK
  2. 2.School of Life Sciences, Gibbet Hill CampusUniversity of WarwickCoventryUK
  3. 3.School of Geography and Geosciences, Earth SciencesSt AndrewsUK
  4. 4.School of Archaeology, History and AnthropologyUniversity of Wales Trinity Saint DavidCeredigionUK
  5. 5.School of Computer ScienceUniversity of NottinghamNingboChina
  6. 6.Department of Classics, Ancient History and ArchaeologyUniversity of BirminghamBirminghamUK
  7. 7.Maritime Archaeology Trust, National Oceanography CentreSouthamptonUK

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