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Blackness and Colonial Settlerhood: A Purposeful Provocation

  • George J. Sefa Dei
Chapter
Part of the Critical Studies of Education book series (CSOE, volume 4)

Abstract

This chapter seeks to clarify and simultaneously trouble several key concepts that inform or have been assumed through the popular call to “decolonize anti-racism.” For example, Lawrence and Dua’s (2005) thought-provoking article Decolonizing Antiracism. These concepts include Euro-colonialism and settler colonialism; settlerhood and settler White colonial discourse and settler colonialism; complicity and implication; and responsibility. My argument is that neither I, nor any other Black/African residing on Turtle Island, can be referred as a settler, and charged with complicity as Lawrence and Dua (2005) long ago claimed. Instead, the chapter provides new coordinates for collective and global mobilization by troubling the politics of “decolonizing solidarity” as the intellectual flavor of the moment. This is done by offering Indigeneity as an international category and as a coordinate for decolonizing (and) antiracist work. Ideas put forward in the chapter are aided by many who add complexity and nuance to decolonizing (and) anti-racist scholarship and praxis. It is opined that theorizing the Indigenous as an international category allows us to mobilize as an international category and as an international collective of multiple anti-racist communities that can build solidarities with Indigenous Peoples and their decolonizing work. Indigeneity provides a category, and a collective, that can mobilize support for decolonizing work that reaches Indigenous Peoples across the world.

Keywords

Indigenous People Binary Logic White Supremacy Indigenous Land Settler Colonialism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • George J. Sefa Dei
    • 1
  1. 1.Ontario Institute for Studies in EducationUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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