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Trash Cinema and Oscar Gold: Quentin Tarantino, Intertextuality, and Industry Prestige

Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Adaptation and Visual Culture book series (PSADVC)

Abstract

Known for making movies about movies, writer-director Quentin Tarantino reached new heights of Oscar success with the intertextual war film Inglourious Basterds (2009) and the allusive representation of slavery in Django Unchained (2012). This chapter examines both films through the lens of industry recognition by looking at how the history of writing awards at the Academy indicates a shifting relationship to the kind of multi-sourced, cinema-focused adaptation that Tarantino undertakes. The categorization of Tarantino’s writing under ‘Original Screenplay’ shows how contemporary awards culture defines both adaptation and originality, while his success with awards voters has started new cycles of prestige and pushed industry focus away from conventional representations of war and white-centred representation of race relations.

Keywords

Django Unchained Inglourious Basterds Original Screenplay Candidate Pictures Twin Photographs 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Communication and DesignBilkent UniversityAnkaraTurkey

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