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Flood Design Discharge and Case Studies

  • Zekâi ŞenEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Protection against floods is possible by construction of some engineering structure, but their dimensioning needs to scientific calculations, where flood design discharge plays the major role. The definition of flood design discharge is given with different choices including probable maximum flood (PMF) as explained in Chap. 2, standard project flood, flood of a specific return period, and the use of intensity-duration-frequency curves. The causes of floods are explained in terms of landslides, rock falls, debris flow, and sediment yield with suitable calculation methodologies and design methodologies.

Keywords

Debris flow Design discharge Flood assessment stages Hydro-technical consideration Land slide Possible maximum flood Rock fall Sedimentation 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Department of Civil EngineeringIstanbul Medipol UniversityBeykoz, IstanbulTurkey

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