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Investigating Chromatin Organisation Using Single Molecule Localisation Microscopy

  • Kirti PrakashEmail author
Chapter
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Part of the Springer Theses book series (Springer Theses)

Abstract

In this chapter, I discuss the technical details of single molecule localisation microscopy (SMLM) to investigate spatial and temporal organisation of DNA. The DNA is hierarchically folded at multiple levels to become more compacted and functionally organise itself inside of the nucleus. This spatial arrangement in turn affects the functionality of DNA.

Keywords

Point Spread Function Localisation Accuracy Labelling Density Drift Correction Localisation Precision 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Heidelberg UniversityHeidelbergGermany
  2. 2.Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB)MainzGermany

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