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Non-Cartesian Dualism and Meso-relational Media

  • Ihor Lubashevsky
Chapter
Part of the Understanding Complex Systems book series (UCS)

Abstract

In Chap.  1 (Sect.  1.7) I have introduced the concept of effective dualism as a useful approach to developing mathematical models of human behavior. Within this approach the human person is considered to be composed of two complementary components, objective and subjective ones, which possess their own properties and are governed by their own laws. It is essential that these properties and laws belong to a macrolevel description regarding human individuals as whole entities. Thereby any question about how the objective and subjective components are related to each other at physiological, biochemical, or even deeper levels is beyond the scope of this approach. So a reader may pose a question as to whether the effective dualism is something more than a merely epistemological approach introduced for the sake of convenience. The main goal of this chapter is to ague for the existence of a certain ontological ground of effective dualism. In particular, in this chapter we discuss fundamental reasons for considering the objective and subjective components ontologically irreducible to each other.

Keywords

Causal Power Mental Property Property Dualism Subjective Component Substance Dualism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Ihor Lubashevsky
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Computer Science & EngineeringUniversity of AizuAizu-WakamatsuJapan

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