Transit Leap: A Deployment Path for Shared-Use Autonomous Vehicles that Supports Sustainability

Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Mobility book series (LNMOB)

Abstract

The concept of Transit Leap is introduced and explained as robotic, shared-use, multi-passenger vehicle applications that start small, expand by demand, merge, and spread. It is an approach to deploying automated vehicles that is meant to blunt the long-established worldwide trend of ongoing increases in the number of private vehicles. Transit Leap is an alternative to year-by-year automotive feature creep, which is currently the most likely path to ubiquitous robotic mobility, absent public policy intervention. Transit Leap helps bypass the interim challenges of semi-autonomous and mixed-autonomy scenarios, and supports equity in mobility, as well as environmental quality and the financial viability of public transit networks.

Keywords

Autonomous vehicles Disruptive innovation Driverless Labor disruption Mobility as a service Public transit Public–private partnerships Self-driving Service deployment Technology forecasting Transit Leap Transportation as a service Transportation policy Urban economics Vehicle automation 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Grush Niles StrategicTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Grush Niles StrategicSeattleUSA

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