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History of Development: Towards Human Development

  • Tadashi Hirai
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter overviews the conceptual shift in development after the Second World War to delve into the historical background of human development. Although human development officially began in 1990 with a direct contribution by Mahbub ul Haq and Amartya Sen, the idea has evolved over time and been greatly influenced by preceding events (e.g. Bandung Conference, North-South Roundtable) and figures (e.g. U Thant, Robert McNamara). With a particular focus on its comparison with basic needs, an alternative approach to the orthodoxy prior to human development, it finds that both approaches have much more in common than often believed, not only in practice but also in concept. To this extent, the success of human development cannot be attributed solely to its conceptual ground.

Keywords

Human Development United Nations United Nations Development Programme International Labour Organization Capability Approach 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tadashi Hirai
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of TokyoTokyoJapan

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