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Social Media and Networking in Surgical Practice

  • Erin Bresnahan
  • Adam C. Nelson
  • Brian P. Jacob
Chapter

Abstract

The widespread accessibility to social media platforms, such as Facebook™, affords all of the stakeholders interested in optimizing patient outcomes within a specific surgical discipline the extraordinary opportunity to participate in the rapid global exchange of education and ideas. Closed groups, or communities, shielded from the public domain, that are designed to optimize patient outcomes and quality improvement, are changing the way surgeons educate themselves and eachother. It is important for any new surgeon today to understand the pros and cons of using online social media.

Keywords

Social media Networking SMN Professionalism HIPAA 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Erin Bresnahan
    • 1
  • Adam C. Nelson
    • 2
  • Brian P. Jacob
    • 3
  1. 1.Icahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of General SurgeryMount Sinai HospitalNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Department of SurgeryMount Sinai Health SystemNew YorkUSA

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