Skip to main content

Resilient Education: Confronting Perplexity and Uncertainty

  • 1040 Accesses

Part of the Palgrave Studies in Education and the Environment book series (PSEE)

Abstract

The chapter explores the role that education plays in a context of growing conflict that magnifies the usual challenges faced by environmental education. The promotion of extractive megaprojects (opencast mining, micro-dams, shale gas extraction), including several preconized as alternative production and sustainable energy strategies (giant wind turbines), has resulted in social conflicts as a result of the breakdown of community ties, the destruction of regional economies, the loss of cultural diversity and the degradation of environments. In areas where such investments are located, local relationships have been disjointed and then selectively integrated and subordinated to globalized value chains led by large transnational corporations. This chapter ends with consideration of strategies that can be undertaken to strengthen local resilience against the onslaught of huge economic forces that tend to elicit the subjection of local governments.

Keywords

  • Environmental education
  • Neoextractivism
  • Resilient education

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Notes

  1. 1.

    The concept of resilience in the social sciences has been useful to characterize a set of phenomena related to individual or community capacities to bounce back from adverse situations of disturbance and instability and to recover conditions of self-organization (Adger, 2000). This chapter emphasizes a meaning of the concept that focuses on resilience from a political, ecological, and educational perspective. We are mindful, however, that the use of “resilience” is also currently being contested (Neocleous, 2013).

  2. 2.

    Assassinated in early 2016, Berta Cáceres led a movement that in 2013 and in 2014 got the World Bank and the multinational Chinese Sinohydro, to desist from building a hydroelectric dam on the Gualcarque River, listed by the Lenca Indians as sacred and crucial for their survival.

  3. 3.

    Through foundations and philanthropies, elite groups and corporations exert influence in decision-making at different political and social levels. Examples include the Magsaysay award for community leaders from Asia, and other funding of certain social movements and leaders (Negi, 2008).

References

  • Adger, W. N. (2000). Social and ecological resilience: Are they related? Progress in Human Geography, 24(3), 347–364.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Apple, M. W. (2004). Ideology and curriculum. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bauman, Z. (2005). Liquid life. Cambridge, MA: Polity Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bauman, Z. (2015). Modernidad líquida. México: Fondo de Cultura Económica.

    Google Scholar 

  • Foster, J. B. (1999). Marx’s theory of metabolic rift: Classical foundations for environmental sociology. American Journal of Sociology, 15(2), 366–405.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • González, J. A., & Montes, C. (2010). Cooperación para el desarrollo en tiempos de cambio global: cuando seguir haciendo lo mismo ya no es una opción. Fundación IPADE: Cuatro grandes retos, una solución global (pp. 8–25). Madrid: Fundación IPADE por un desarrollo sostenible.

    Google Scholar 

  • González-Gaudiano, E. (2007). Schooling and environment in Latin America in the third millennium. Environmental Education Research, 13(2), 155–169.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • González-Gaudiano, E. J. (2016). ESD: Power, politics, and policy: “Tragic optimism” from Latin America. The Journal of Environmental Education, 47(2), 118–127.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Gudynas, E. (2009). Diez tesis urgentes sobre el nuevo extractivismo. Contextos y demandas bajo el progresismo sudamericano actual. En VVAA. Extractivismo, política y sociedad (pp. 187–225). Quito: CAAP/CLAES.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gudynas, E., & Acosta, A. (2011). El buen vivir o la disolución de la idea del progreso. In M. Rojas (coord.). La medición del progreso y el bienestar. Propuesta desde América Latina (pp. 103–110). México: Foro Consultivo Científico y Tecnológico.

    Google Scholar 

  • Harari, Y. N. (2013). From animals into gods: A brief history of humankind. Kinneret, Israel: Dvir Publishing House Ltd.

    Google Scholar 

  • Harvey, D. (2003). The new imperialism. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Retrieved from http://eatonak.org/IPE501/downloads/files/New%20Imperialism.pdf

    Google Scholar 

  • Hatzfeld, H. (2011). Les légitimés ordinaires. Au nom de quoi devrions-nous nous tarie? Paris: L’Harmattan.

    Google Scholar 

  • IPCC. (2014). Climate change synthesis report 2014: Summary for policymakers. Retrieved from http://www.ipcc.ch/pdf/assessment-report/ar5/syr/AR5_SYR_FINAL_SPM.pdf

  • Jickling, B., & Wals, A. (2008). Globalization and environmental education: Looking beyond sustainable development. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 40(1), 1–21.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Kegley, C., & Blanton, S. (2016). World politics: Trend and transformation, 2016–2017. Toronto: Nelson Education.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kemmis, S., & Mutton, R. (2012). Education for sustainability (EfS): Practice and practice architectures. Environmental Education Research, 18(2), 187–207.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Kinetz, E. (2010, October 19). Suicides spark scrutiny of Indian microfinance. Bloomberg BusinessWeek. Retrieved from http://www.microfinancetransparency.com/evidence/PDF/12.26%20Business%20Week%20article%20India%20suicides.pdf

  • Latouche, S. (2008). La apuesta por el decrecimiento. ¿Cómo salir del imaginario dominante? Barcelona: Icaria.

    Google Scholar 

  • Machado, H. (2009). Minería transnacional, conflictos socioterritoriales y nuevas dinámicas expropiatorias. El caso de Minera Alumbrera. En M. Svampa y M. Antonelli (eds.) Minería transnacional, narrativas del desarrollo y resistencias sociales (pp. 205–228). Buenos Aires: Biblos.

    Google Scholar 

  • Machado, H. (2013). Crisis ecológica, conflictos socioambientales y orden neocolonial: Las paradojas de NuestrAmérica en las fronteras del extractivismo. Revista de Estudios Latino americanos (REBELA), 3(1), 118–155. Retrieved from http://rebela.emnuvens.com.br/pc/article/view/137/269

    Google Scholar 

  • McLaren, P., & Kincheloe, J. L. (2008). Pedagogía crítica: De qué hablamos, dónde estamos. Barcelona: Graó.

    Google Scholar 

  • Muñoz Molina, A. (2013). Todo lo que era sólido. Barcelona: Seix Barral.

    Google Scholar 

  • Negi, R. S. (2008). Magsaysay award: Asian Nobel, not so noble. Economic & Political Weekly, 43(34), 14–16.

    Google Scholar 

  • Neocleous, M. (2013, March/April). Resisting resilience. Radical Philosophy, 178, 2–7.

    Google Scholar 

  • Piketty, T. (2014). Capital in the 21st century. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Plepys, A. (2002). The grey side of ICT. Environmental Impact Assessment Review, 22(5), 509–523.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Popkewitz, T. (2009). Curriculum study, curriculum history, and curriculum theory: The reason of reason. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 41(3), 301–319.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Porto Gonçalves, C. (2001). Geo-grafía:. Movimientos sociales, nuevas territorialidades y sustentabilidad. México, DF: Siglo XXI.

    Google Scholar 

  • Riechmann, J. ((coord.)). (2008). ¿En qué estamos fallando? Cambio social para ecologizar el mundo. Barcelona: Icaria-Antrazyt

    Google Scholar 

  • Roy, A. (2015). Espectros del capitalismo. Madrid: Capitán Swing Libros.

    Google Scholar 

  • Santos, B. S. (2009). Una epistemología del sur: La reinvención del conocimiento y la emancipación social. Buenos Aires: CLACSO-Siglo XXI.

    Google Scholar 

  • Santos, M. (1996). Metamorfosis del espacio habitado. Barcelona: Oikos-Tau.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sauvé, L. (2010). Educación científica y educación ambiental: Un cruce fecundo. Enseñanza de las Ciencias, 28(1), 5–18.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sauvé, L. (2013). La educación ambiental y la primavera social. Jandiekua. Revista Mexicana de Educación Ambiental, 1, 31–42.

    Google Scholar 

  • Svampa, M. (2008). Cambio de época. Movimientos sociales y poder político. Buenos Aires: Siglo XXI.

    Google Scholar 

  • Svampa, M. (2011). Minería y Neoextractivismo Latinoamericano. Retrieved from http://www.dariovive.org/?cat=12

  • Svampa, M. (2012). Movimientos sociales, gobiernos y nuevos escenarios de conflicto en América Latina. En C. Moreira, & Avaro, D. (coords). América Latina hoy. Sociedad y política (pp. 15–68). Buenos Aires: Teseo, UABC, CPES, FEyRI.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tuck, E., & McKenzie, M. (2015). Relational validity and the “where” of inquiry place and land in qualitative research. Qualitative Inquiry, 21(7), 633–638.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • World Economic Forum. (2015). Annual meeting. Retrieved from https://www.weforum.org/events/world-economic-forum-annual-meeting-2015/

  • Worldwatch Institute. (2015). State of the world 2015: Confronting hidden threats to sustainability. Washington, DC: Covelo & London, Island Press.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Edgar J. González-Gaudiano .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2017 The Author(s)

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

González-Gaudiano, E.J., Gutiérrez-Pérez, J. (2017). Resilient Education: Confronting Perplexity and Uncertainty. In: Jickling, B., Sterling, S. (eds) Post-Sustainability and Environmental Education. Palgrave Studies in Education and the Environment. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-51322-5_9

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-51322-5_9

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Macmillan, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-319-51321-8

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-319-51322-5

  • eBook Packages: EducationEducation (R0)