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Improving the Learning of Child Movements Through Games

  • Miguel Raposo
  • Raquel Barateiro
  • Susana Martins
  • Tiago CardosoEmail author
  • Miguel Palha
  • José Barata
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes of the Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering book series (LNICST, volume 176)

Abstract

A Developmental Coordination Disorder can be identified when children show motor skills either below the expected levels considered adequate to their physical age or the opportunities provided for their learning. This problem affects four to six percent of school-age children, meaning that, from a very early stage of their life, they have several difficulties to adapt to the daily needs. In order to reduce the impact caused by this disorder, a team of therapists from “Centro DIFERENÇASCentro de Desenvolvimento Infantil” collected a wide range of exercises that allow the stimulus of several motor areas, including both the Gross and Fine Motor Skills. However, the application of this therapeutics is restricted to regular appointments. Since the motor stimulus, in order to be effective, need continuous application, it was found to be necessary to have a tool that in a practical and affordable way, fulfill this need. Therefore, the proposal presented in this article describes the creation of a systematic collection of such exercises in a friendly user manner for the children to be able to exercise elsewhere.

Keywords

Developmental Coordination Disorder Serious games Kinect Sensor Natural user interface 

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Copyright information

© ICST Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Miguel Raposo
    • 1
  • Raquel Barateiro
    • 2
  • Susana Martins
    • 2
  • Tiago Cardoso
    • 1
    Email author
  • Miguel Palha
    • 2
  • José Barata
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologias, Departamento de Engenharia Eletrotécnica e de ComputadoresUniversidade Nova de LisboaMonte da CaparicaPortugal
  2. 2.Centro Diferenças – Centro de Desenvolvimento Infantil, Bela-VistaLisbonPortugal

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