Managing Conflict: An Examination of Three-Way Alliances in Canadian Escort and Massage Businesses

  • Lauren Casey
  • Bill McCarthy
  • Rachel Phillips
  • Cecilia Benoit
  • Mikael Jansson
  • Samantha Magnus
  • Chris Atchison
  • Bill Reimer
  • Dan Reist
  • Frances M. Shaver
Chapter

Abstract

Weitzer (2009) notes that the sex work employment triangle involves three groups: workers, clients, and various third parties; the latter includes pimps, facilitators, brokers, managers, and others who help organize or facilitate sex work. Our research focuses on the third group, and in particular on managers who work in legal or licensed sex industry businesses. We gathered data in 2013 from 43 managers of escort agency and massage parlor businesses in five Canadian census metropolitan areas. Following Weitzer’s (2009) recommendation, managers were interviewed as part of larger study that included people who sell and who purchase sexual services. We argue that one central responsibility of managers is to prevent and intercede in conflicts between workers and clients, as well as between workers, and that managers play an important role in the occupational health and safety of sex industry populations. These findings make a novel contribution to the sociology of service work literature; they are also important in the context of recent legal changes in Canada which made commercial-sex businesses and third-party material benefits from them, illegal.

Keywords

Sex work Management Triangular power relations Conflict 

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lauren Casey
    • 1
  • Bill McCarthy
    • 2
  • Rachel Phillips
    • 1
  • Cecilia Benoit
    • 3
  • Mikael Jansson
    • 1
  • Samantha Magnus
    • 1
  • Chris Atchison
    • 5
  • Bill Reimer
    • 4
  • Dan Reist
    • 1
  • Frances M. Shaver
    • 4
  1. 1.Centre for Addictions Research of BC, University of VictoriaVictoriaCanada
  2. 2.Department of SociologyUniversity of DavisDavisUSA
  3. 3.Department of SociologyCentre for Addictions Research of BC, University of VictoriaVictoriaCanada
  4. 4.Department of SociologyConcordia UniversityMontrealCanada
  5. 5.Department of SociologyUniversity of VictoriaVictoriaCanada

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