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Nutrition in Adolescence

Part of the Nutrition and Health book series (NH)

Abstract

This chapter provides a brief overview of physical and cognitive growth and development during adolescence and how these drastic changes may impact eating behaviors. Body and weight dissatisfaction, meal skipping and snacking in place of eating meals are frequent behaviors that can impact health. Annual screening for weight status and hypertension are recommended; however, screening for hyperlipidemia and insulin resistance is recommended only for obese adolescents or those with a significant family history of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. A staged approach to weight management is recommended based on degree of adiposity and the presence of comorbidities.

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Adolescent nutrition
  • Disordered eating
  • Adolescent obesity

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Correspondence to Jamie S. Stang Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D.N. .

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Stang, J.S., Stotmeister, B. (2017). Nutrition in Adolescence. In: Temple, N., Wilson, T., Bray, G. (eds) Nutrition Guide for Physicians and Related Healthcare Professionals. Nutrition and Health. Humana Press, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49929-1_4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49929-1_4

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  • Publisher Name: Humana Press, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-319-49928-4

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-319-49929-1

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