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Towards a Personalised and Context-Dependent User Experience in Multimedia and Information Systems

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Part of the International Series on Computer Entertainment and Media Technology book series (ISCEMT)

Abstract

Advances in multimedia and information systems have shifted the focus from general content repositories towards personalized systems. Much effort has been put into modeling and integration of affective states with the purpose of improving overall user experience and functionality of the system. In this chapter, we present a multi-modal dataset of users’ emotional and visual (color) responses to music, with accompanying personal and demographic profiles, which may serve as the knowledge basis for such improvement. Results show that emotional mediation of users’ perceptive states can significantly improve user experience in terms of context-dependent personalization in multimedia and information systems.

Keywords

  • Recommendation System
  • Task Load
  • Current Mood
  • Emotion Label
  • Music Information Retrieval

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    http://www.music-ir.org/mirex/wiki/2014:GC14UX.

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Correspondence to Matevž Pesek .

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Pesek, M., Strle, G., Guna, J., Stojmenova, E., Pogačnik, M., Marolt, M. (2016). Towards a Personalised and Context-Dependent User Experience in Multimedia and Information Systems. In: Lugmayr, A., Stojmenova, E., Stanoevska, K., Wellington, R. (eds) Information Systems and Management in Media and Entertainment Industries. International Series on Computer Entertainment and Media Technology. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49407-4_8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49407-4_8

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