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US External Labor Governance: Imposing Sanctions or Providing Assistance?

  • Myriam Oehri
Chapter
Part of the The European Union in International Affairs book series (EUIA)

Abstract

In employing the conceptual framework of external labor governance, Oehri provides a nuanced picture of how the USA fosters workers’ rights in Mexico, Morocco, and the Dominican Republic. Drawing on the analysis of the NAALC, the US-Morocco FTA, the CAFTA-DR, extensive interview data, and relevant documents, “US External Labor Governance: Imposing Sanctions or Providing Assistance?” illustrates that US external labor governance is characterized by mechanisms that address labor rights’ violations hierarchically and work on the enhancement of labor standards in a cooperative and horizontal manner. It furthermore reveals that the approach the US opts for in practice is dominated by providing assistance rather than imposing sanctions. The chapter concludes with a discussion on the generalizability of the case studies’ findings.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Myriam Oehri
    • 1
  1. 1.Global Studies InstituteUniversity of GenevaGenèveSwitzerland

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