REWAS 2013 pp 145-154 | Cite as

Thermodynamic Model for Acidic Metal Sulfate from Solubility Data

  • Petri Kobylin
  • Hannu Sippola
  • Pekka Taskinen

Abstract

Acidic metal sulfate solutions are generated in a large scale in the hydro- and pyrometallurgical industries. Acid mine drainage has long been a significant environmental problem in coal and metal mining. Acidic metal sulfate solutions are also produced in steel industry. The demand of recycling and reuse of materials has increased significantly especially in EU. Dumping a neutralized deposit is not an option any more. Thus, several techniques of recycling and reuse of sulfuric acid and/or metal sulfates from the side streams are needed.

When developing alternative solutions a better understanding of the thermodynamic behavior of MnSO4-H2SO4-H2O system is needed. In this study a thermodynamic model of this system is developed using Gibbs energy minimisation, Pitzer model and CALPHAD method to yield thermodynamically consistent set of values for solubility of metal sulfate in a wide temperature and concentration range.

Keywords

thermodynamic modeling Pitzer model acid mine drainage 

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Copyright information

© TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society) 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Petri Kobylin
    • 1
  • Hannu Sippola
    • 1
    • 2
  • Pekka Taskinen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Materials Science and EngineeringAalto UniversityFinland
  2. 2.Permanent address FCG Design and EngineeringHelsinkiFinland

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