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Quantifying the effect of 3D spatial resolution on the accuracy of microstructural distributions

  • Gregory Loughnane
  • Michael Groeber
  • Michael Uchic
  • Matthew Riley
  • Megna Shah
  • Raghavan Srinivasan
  • Ramana Grandhi
Conference paper

Abstract

The choice of spatial resolution for experimentally-collected 3D microstructural data is often governed by general rules of thumb. For example, serial section experiments often strive to collect at least ten sections through the average feature-of-interest. However, the desire to collect high resolution data in 3D is greatly tempered by the exponential growth in collection times and data storage requirements. This paper explores the use of systematic down-sampling of synthetically-generated grain microstructures to examine the effect of resolution on the calculated distributions of microstructural descriptors such as grain size, number of nearest neighbors, aspect ratio, and Ω3.

Keywords

microstructure 3D characterization serial sectioning grain size 

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Copyright information

© TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society) 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gregory Loughnane
    • 1
  • Michael Groeber
    • 2
  • Michael Uchic
    • 2
  • Matthew Riley
    • 3
  • Megna Shah
    • 4
  • Raghavan Srinivasan
    • 1
  • Ramana Grandhi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical & Materials EngineeringWright State UniversityDaytonUSA
  2. 2.Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials & Manufacturing DirectorateWright-Patterson AFBUSA
  3. 3.University of IdahoMoscowRussia
  4. 4.UES, Inc.DaytonUSA

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