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Study on Dezincification and De-Lead of Blast Furnace Dust by Fluidized Reduction Experiment

  • Shufeng Yang
  • Chengsong Liu
  • Xiaojie Gao
  • Jingshe Li
Conference paper

Abstract

In the blast furnace process, the dust entrained in the blast furnace gas enters into the down-comer, flows through the gravity dust separator (to eliminate coarse particles) and then is collected in a bag-house. The powder collected by the baghouse is called bag dust, while both fractions are called blast furnace dust whose main components are C and Fe. The dust also contains small amounts of nonferrous metals such as Zn and Pb, which have some value. Also, due to the small particle size and low density the dust is easily suspended in air and so can endanger human health. Therefore it is necessary to develop a process to both treat the dust to recover the metal values and to dispose of the residue — preferably by recycling to the blast furnace itself via the sinter strand. These objectives will result in good economic, environmental and social benefits [1].

Keywords

Blast furnace dust reduction experiment de-zinc de-lead 

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Copyright information

© TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shufeng Yang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Chengsong Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiaojie Gao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jingshe Li
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Advanced MetallurgyUniversity of Science and Technology BeijingBeijingChina
  2. 2.School of Ecological and Metallurgical EngineeringUniversity of Science and Technology BeijingBeijingChina

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