Advertisement

Sintering Process for Limonitic Nickel Laterite

  • Enguang Guo
  • Mei Liu
  • Cheng Pan
  • Qiugang Yuan
  • Xuewei Lv
Conference paper

Abstract

Land-based nickel resources include nickel sulfide and nickel laterite. With the consumption of high grade nickel sulfide, use of nickel laterite has received more and more attention. The mineralogy and sintering behavior of limonitic nickel laterite with high iron and low nickel and silica was studied to offer technical support for producing ferronickel through sintering-blast furnace route. The mineralogy results showed that the main phases in this kind of nickel laterite are goethite (FeO(OH)), gibbsite (Al(OH)3) and NiFe2O4. The TGA (Thermogravimetric Analysis) and DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry) revealed hydroxide minerals in addition to absorbed water. After the sintering experiments the chemical composition, phases present (XRD analysis) and physical properties of the sinter were studied. The content of FeO in the sinter increased with increasing basicity up to 1.3, and then decreased with further increase in basicity. The yield of sinter increased (from 73% to 80%) with increase in the basicity from 1.1 to 1.7, and then the yield decreased with the further increase in basicity. Mg(Ni)(Fe,Al)2O4 is the main phase in the sinter while MgCaSiO4 and Fe2SiO4 is the main binder phase when the basicity is 1.1~1.5, and MgCaSiO4, Fe2SiO4 and SFCA is the main binder phase when the basicity is 1.7~2.1.

Keywords

Sintering Limonitic nickel laterite Binder phase 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    N. Voermann et al., “Furnace Technology for Ferro-Nickel Production — an Update” in International Laterite Nickel Symposium, March 18, (Minerals, Metals and Materials Society, Charlotte, NC, 2004) 563–577.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    R.A. Bergman, “Nickel production from low-iron laterite ores: Process descriptions”, CIM Bulletin, 96 (2003), 127–138.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    C. Panet al., “Gaseous Reduction of Pellets of Laterite Ore Containing Carbon”, Metalurgia International, 16(1) (2011), 5–9.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    J. Kim et al., “Calcination of low-grade laterite for concentration of Ni by magnetic separation”, Minerals Engineering, 23(4) (2010), 282–288CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    T. Hu et al., “Effect of Coal Blending Ratio on Sintering of Philippine Nickeliferous Laterite”, Metalurgia International, 16(8) (2011), 32–35.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    X.W.Lv et al., “Mineral Change of Philippine and Indonesia Nickel Lateritic Ore during Sintering and Mineralogy of Their Sinter”, ISIJ International, 50(3), (2010), 380–385.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    X.W.Lv et al., “Dehydrating and sintering of Philippine nickel laterite”, Canadian Metallurgical Quarterly, 50(1), (2011), 20–27.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Enguang Guo
    • 1
  • Mei Liu
    • 1
  • Cheng Pan
    • 1
  • Qiugang Yuan
    • 1
  • Xuewei Lv
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Materials Science and EngineeringChongqing UniversityChongqingChina

Personalised recommendations