Metallurgical Plant Optimization Through the use of Flowsheet Simulation Modelling

  • Mark William Kennedy
Conference paper

Abstract

Modern metallurgical plants typically have complex flowsheets and operate on a continuous basis. Real time interactions within such processes can be complex and the impacts of streams such as recycles on process efficiency and stability can be highly unexpected prior to actual operation. Current desktop computing power, combined with state-of-the-art flowsheet simulation software like Metsim, allow for thorough analysis of designs to explore the interaction between operating rate, heat and mass balances and in particular the potential negative impact of recycles. Using plant information systems, it is possible to combine real plant data with simple steady state models, using dynamic data exchange links to allow for near real time de-bottlenecking of operations. Accurate analytical results can also be combined with detailed unit operations models to allow for feed-forward model-based-control. This paper will explore some examples of the application of Metsim to real world engineering and plant operational issues.

Keywords

flowsheet model Metsim 

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Copyright information

© TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark William Kennedy
    • 1
  1. 1.Proval Partners SASwitzerland

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