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Current Status and Future Direction of Low-Emission Integrated Steelmaking Process

  • S Jahanshahi
  • A Deev
  • N Haque
  • L Lu
  • J G Mathieson
  • T E Norgate
  • Y Pan
  • P Ridgeway
  • H Rogers
  • M A Somerville
  • D Xie
  • P Zulli

Abstract

In 2006 the Australian steel industry and CSIRO initiated an R&D program to reduce the industry’s net greenhouse emission by at least 50%. Given that most of the CO2 emissions in steel production occur during the reduction of iron ore to hot metal through use of coal and coke, a key focus of this program has been to substitute these with renewable carbon (charcoal) sourced from sustainable sources such as plantations of biomass species. Another key component of the program has been to recover the waste heat from molten slags and produce a by-product that could be substituted for Portland cement.

This paper provides an overview of the low-emission Integrated Steelmaking Process, progress made over the past seven years and the program’s future direction which includes proposed demonstrations of the technologies developed including large scale piloting and full scale plant trials.

Keywords

GHG emission steelmaking biomass charcoal waste heat recovery dry slag granulation techno-economics life cycle assessment 

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Copyright information

© TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • S Jahanshahi
    • 1
  • A Deev
    • 1
  • N Haque
    • 1
  • L Lu
    • 1
  • J G Mathieson
    • 1
  • T E Norgate
    • 1
  • Y Pan
    • 1
  • P Ridgeway
    • 2
  • H Rogers
    • 3
  • M A Somerville
    • 1
  • D Xie
    • 1
  • P Zulli
    • 3
  1. 1.CSIRO Minerals Down Under FlagshipClayton, VictoriaAustralia
  2. 2.ArriumNewcastleAustralia
  3. 3.BlueScope SteelPort KemblaAustralia

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