Fabrication and Characterization of Niobium-Aluminum Composites: Effect of Sintering Temperature

  • Lucio Vazquez
  • Juan Manuel Miranda
  • Elizabeth Garfias
  • Dulce Dyolotzin

Abstract

Objectives of this research were to measure the distribution of Nb particles in the Al matrix, (density ratio 8.6:2.7) to define the effect that sintering temperature, 390 and 550°C, had on the consolidation of the composites, and the influence on the density of the mechanical properties: hardness, elastic strength, elastic modulus, ductility, and impact toughness. Specimens, 3, 5 and 7 % wt of nanometric particles of Nb, the rest 100 meshes particles of Al, were prepared by a P/M technique. Nb — Al powders were mixed in a mill for 12 h, using a 6 mm balls load of ZrO2, the ratio in wt ZrO2 balls/composite powder was 10:1. The powders were transferred to a die to make cylindrical specimens, applying a pressure of 3.75 MPa, the specimens were sintered either at 390 or 550°C for 3 h, within a N2 atmosphere. Mechanical properties do not show an reinforcement effect due to Nb presence, while Vickers hardness is about 10 points higher for composites, elastic strength decreases 10 points gradually for composites, the highest value correspond to 3 % Nb composite, Al has a hardness slightly higher than the composite with 7 % Nb. Scanning microscopy showed an homogeneous Nb particles distribution for samples sintered at 550°C, homogeneity decreased for samples sintered at 390°C.

Keywords

Composites Nb-Al Particles Distribution Mechanical Properties Microscopy 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Lopez N, Rodriguez X., Domínguez S., Vazquez L. Cortés V., Dominguez M., Lara G., Vite M., “Manufacture and Characterization of Al-3Mg-Nb Alloys”, Supplemental Proceedings, v. 3., 289 – 294, 137 Annual Meeting & Exhibition, TMS 2008.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Vazquez L., Hernandez L., Altamirano A., Cortés V., Garfía E., and Vite M., “Effect of Composition of B4C Aluminum Composites on Mechanical Properties and Resistance Corrosion”, Proceedings Advance Composites, for Aerospace, Marine, and Land Applications, 23 – 33, Annual meeting & Exhibition, TMS 2014.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Goni, L., Mitxelena, I., and Coleto, I., Development of low cost metal matrix composites for commercial applications, Material Science and Technology, v. 16, No. 7–8. July – August 2000, pp. 743 – 746.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Bhagat, R. B., Advanced aluminum powder metallurgy, alloys and composites, ASM Handbook, v.7, 1998, pp. 840.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Ruiz-Navas E. M., Da Costa, C. E., Lopez F. V., and Castello, J. M. T., Mechanical alloying: a method to metallic powder composite materials, Revista Metalúrgica, Madrid, v. 13, No. 4, 2000, pp. 279–286.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Torralba J. M., Da Costa, C. E. and Velasco F., P/M aluminum matrix composites: an overview, J. of materials Processing Technology, v. 133, Issues 1–2, 2003, pp. 203–206.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Kaczmar, I., Pietrzak, K., and Wlosinski, W., The production and application of metal matrix composite materials, J. of Materials processing technology, v. 106, 2000, pp. 58–67.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Annual Book of Standards, v. 6-2, 2010.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society) 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lucio Vazquez
    • 1
  • Juan Manuel Miranda
    • 1
  • Elizabeth Garfias
    • 1
  • Dulce Dyolotzin
    • 1
  1. 1.Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-AzcapotzalcoMéxico D. F.Mexico

Personalised recommendations