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Clinical Effects and Applications of Ketamine

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Total Intravenous Anesthesia and Target Controlled Infusions

Abstract

Ketamine was originally developed as a potent but safe intravenous anesthetic drug which has subsequently been used for premedication, sedation, induction, and maintenance of general anesthesia (Sinner and Graf, Handb Exp Pharmacol 182:313–333, 2008). It is currently widely administered to children for dissociative sedation for painful procedures performed outside the operating room (Green et al., Ann Emerg Med 54:158–168, 2009; Green et al., Ann Emerg Med 54(2):171–80.e1–4, 2009). Due to its unique and diverse properties, a large number of additional indications for ketamine have developed since it was derived from phencyclidine in 1963. This chapter will review the history, pharmacology, clinical effects, and applications of ketamine. The evidence for and against traditional and expanding indications for ketamine administration will be examined.

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Acknowledgments

I wish to acknowledge Dr. Keira Mason for her unwavering support of the multidisciplinary approach to sedation for children outside the operating room and Drs. Bo Kennedy and Steve Green for being my ketamine mentors and colleagues.

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Roback, M.G. (2017). Clinical Effects and Applications of Ketamine. In: Absalom, A., Mason, K. (eds) Total Intravenous Anesthesia and Target Controlled Infusions. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-47609-4_14

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