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Noticing Distinctions Among and Within Instances of Student Mathematical Thinking

  • Shari L. Stockero
  • Keith R. Leatham
  • Laura R. Van Zoest
  • Blake E. Peterson
Chapter
Part of the Research in Mathematics Education book series (RME)

Abstract

In this chapter, we argue that there are two critical aspects of noticing student mathematical thinking: noticing within an instance of student thinking and noticing among instances of student thinking. We use the noticing literature to illustrate these distinctions. We then discuss how the MOST Analytic Framework analysis provides structure and guidance for noticing both within and among instances, and illustrate the complex interaction of these two types of noticing through the analysis of an excerpt of classroom dialogue. We conclude by offering the perspective that studies of noticing must go beyond placing value on student mathematical thinking to discriminating among instances of student thinking based on their potential to be used to support students’ understanding of important mathematics.

Keywords

Teacher noticing Student mathematical thinking Teachable moments Ambitious instruction Building on student thinking 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research report is based on work supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) under Grant Nos. 1220141, 1220357, and 1220148. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the NSF.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shari L. Stockero
    • 1
  • Keith R. Leatham
    • 2
  • Laura R. Van Zoest
    • 3
  • Blake E. Peterson
    • 2
  1. 1.Michigan Technological UniversityHoughtonUSA
  2. 2.Brigham Young UniversityProvoUSA
  3. 3.Western Michigan UniversityKalamazooUSA

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