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Mechanisms of Antimalarial Drug Resistance

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Abstract

It has been estimated that in 2013 there were approximately 198 million cases of malaria (with an uncertainty range of 124–283 million) and an estimated 584,000 deaths (with an uncertainty range of 367,000–755,000), with the majority of deaths amongst African children under 5 years of age [1]. As a result of global efforts, including in transmission control (e.g. removal of breeding sites using insecticides and prevention of human contact through screens and bed nets), improved antimalarial chemotherapy and early effective case management, malaria mortality rates have fallen by 47 % globally and by 54 % in Africa since 2000 [1].

Keywords

  • Malaria
  • Plasmodium
  • Drugs
  • Chemotherapy
  • Chloroquine
  • Artemisinin
  • Resistance

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-46718-4_41
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Fig. 41.1
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Fig. 41.4
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Fig. 41.6

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GAB and SAW acknowledge the support of the Wellcome Trust and the MRC.

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Biagini, G.A., Ward, S.A. (2017). Mechanisms of Antimalarial Drug Resistance. In: Mayers, D., Sobel, J., Ouellette, M., Kaye, K., Marchaim, D. (eds) Antimicrobial Drug Resistance. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-46718-4_41

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