Collaborative Gaming to Enhance Patient Performance During Virtual Therapy

  • Michael Mace
  • Paul Rinne
  • Nawal Kinany
  • Paul Bentley
  • Etienne Burdet
Conference paper
Part of the Biosystems & Biorobotics book series (BIOSYSROB, volume 15)

Abstract

We present a collaborative training game, based on a novel task where the participants are virtually but dynamically coupled and require collective actions for successful task completion. This can be considered a new type of interpersonal interaction which both increases player motivation during training (compared to single-player participation) and also intrinsically balances the skill levels of the two partners without the need for an additional procedure. This is achieved by a temporary averaging, during collaboration, of the individual performance’s which leads to a more balanced playing field and challenge point being set for both partners.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Mace
    • 1
  • Paul Rinne
    • 1
  • Nawal Kinany
    • 1
    • 2
  • Paul Bentley
    • 1
  • Etienne Burdet
    • 1
  1. 1.Imperial College of Science, Technology and MedicineLondonUK
  2. 2.Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)LausanneSwitzerland

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