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Operant Conditioning of the Tibialis Anterior Motor Evoked Potential to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

  • Aiko K. ThompsonEmail author
  • Rachel H. Cote
  • Christina R. Thompson
Conference paper
Part of the Biosystems & Biorobotics book series (BIOSYSROB, volume 15)

Abstract

The activity of corticospinal pathways is important in movement control and its plasticity is essential for learning motor skills and re-learning them after spinal cord injury (SCI) and other CNS disorders. After SCI, corticospinal excitability and connectivity diminish, as SCI disturbs supraspinal connections. However, this can be reversed. Thus, if there is a way to enhance the function of corticospinal pathways, motor function recovery may be improved. The central hypothesis of this study is that operant conditioning of the corticospinal motor evoked potential can strengthen corticospinal connectivity and thereby improve motor function recovery in people after incomplete SCI.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the New York State Spinal Cord Injury Research Trust (C023685), the Morton Cure Paralysis Fund, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NS0695 51), and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (GM104941 to Binder-MacLeod).

References

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    A.K. Thompson, F.R. Pomerantz, J.R. Wolpaw, Operant conditioning of a spinal reflex can improve locomotion after spinal cord injury in humans. J. Neurosci. 33(6), 2365–2375 (2013)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    N.J. Davey et al., Comparison of input-output patterns in the corticospinal system of normal subjects and incomplete spinal cord injured patients. Exp. Brain Res. 127(4), 382–390 (1999)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aiko K. Thompson
    • 1
    Email author
  • Rachel H. Cote
    • 1
  • Christina R. Thompson
    • 1
  1. 1.Christie Evoked Potential Operant Conditioning LaboratoryCollege of Health Professions, Medical University of South CarolinaCharlestonUSA

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