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Evaluation of Force Tracking Controller with Soft Exosuit for Hip Extension Assistance

  • Hao SuEmail author
  • Ye Ding
  • Ignacio Galiana
  • Jozefien Speeckaert
  • Nikos Karavas
  • Philippe Malcolm
  • Christopher Siviy
  • Conor J. Walsh
Conference paper
Part of the Biosystems & Biorobotics book series (BIOSYSROB, volume 16)

Abstract

This abstract describes the design and experimental evaluation of a force tracking controller for hip extension assistance utilizing a soft exosuit connected to a tethered off-board actuation system. The new controller aims to improve the force profile tracking capability and demonstrate its advantages over our previously reported work. The controller was evaluated by one healthy participant walking on a treadmill at 1.35 m/s. Results showed that the system can deliver a predefined force profile robustly with a 200 N peak force. The measured peak force value using force controller was 198.7 ± 2.9 N, and the root-mean-squared (RMS) error was 3.4 N (1.7 % of desired peak force). These results indicate that the force control reduces peak force variability and improves force profile tracking capability.

Keywords

Force Control Peak Force Inertial Measurement Unit Position Controller Force Profile 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This material is based upon the work supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), Warrior Web Program (W911NF-14-C-0051). This work was also partially funded by the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hao Su
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Ye Ding
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ignacio Galiana
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jozefien Speeckaert
    • 1
    • 2
  • Nikos Karavas
    • 1
    • 2
  • Philippe Malcolm
    • 1
    • 2
  • Christopher Siviy
    • 1
    • 2
  • Conor J. Walsh
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied SciencesHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired EngineeringHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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